Kyle’s Column: Review – “The Last Jedi”

In+the+latest+installment+of+Kyle%27s+Column%2C+WSPN%27s+Opinions+Editor+Kyle+Chen+reflects+upon+the+lessons+that+come+with+having+a+cold.

In the latest installment of Kyle’s Column, WSPN’s Opinions Editor Kyle Chen reflects upon the lessons that come with having a cold.

Kyle Chen

Warning: This article contains some considerable spoilers.

Star Wars season is officially back, folks.

The eighth episode in the Star Wars canon, dubbed “The Last Jedi,” finally hit the theaters last Thursday. The long-awaited sequel to “The Force Awakens” has finally arrived.

Let me just say this now: Star Wars was basically my whole childhood, and “The Force Awakens” sits somewhere around the top five of my all-time favorite movies. To say that I anticipated this sequel would be an understatement of Death Star proportions.

As you can imagine, I walked into the theater this weekend with sky-high expectations fueled by the trailers and all the hype surrounding the new movie. And if I’m going to be completely honest, I have to say that I think “The Last Jedi” was overhyped. But, despite my opinion that it fails to meet the standards set by “The Force Awakens,” there are some aspects and moments that still made it quite enjoyable.

The first thing that stands out in “The Last Jedi” – something that makes it distinctly different from the other Star Wars movies – is the amount of comedy involved. It felt like director Rian Johnson wrote the script, looked it over once and then started sprinkling humor in every chance he got. While some of the humorous scenes do seem a bit different from normal Star Wars content, I felt that the added comedy was fresh, unique and helped to lighten the mood in some of the darker parts of the movie.

Speaking of the darker parts of the movie, I thought there certainly were plenty of those throughout. Over the course of the two and a half hours of running time, we see the First Order absolutely decimate the Resistance (or what is left of it, anyway). By the end of the movie, the rebel forces are down to something like two dozen remaining members, and their “allies from the Outer Rim” have turned a blind eye – or a deaf ear – to their distress calls. I’ve had friends tell me that they thought The Last Jedi was too “Disney-esque;” I thought it was quite the contrary. Most Disney movies don’t have as much fighting, death and destruction as this one.

And that brings me to my biggest complaint about “The Last Jedi.” Honestly, my only problem with this new installment in the series was the sheer amount of content stuffed into the plot. I think Johnson crammed way too much stuff into one movie – there were somewhere around five subplots going on at once, all fighting for the attention of the audience. Also, the plot twists just keep coming and coming. Basically, the whole plot is just one big roller coaster – a really, really long roller coaster that just doesn’t stop climbing. Every time you think the movie has reached a resolution of some sort? Nope! The action just keeps on going, and, to be honest, the whole movie in its entirety is just too much to swallow.

Having said that, I do believe that some of the plotlines were very satisfying and well-crafted. The development of Luke and Kylo Ren’s shared backstory (see: why Kylo turned on the Jedi master in the first place) was especially detailed and did answer a lot of questions about the young Solo. And the scene where Yoda comes back and destroys the ancient Jedi tree – honestly, seeing our little green friend again was probably the best part of the movie – even if it was just his Force ghost.

So all in all, I think “The Last Jedi” was still a fantastic movie. While there were some issues with the plot, especially about just the sheer amount of content in it, many of the other aspects in the film, including the wonderful moments reminiscent of the old trilogies, more than make up for it.

Rating: 8.5/10

Opinion articles written by staff members represent their personal views. The opinions expressed do not necessarily represent WSPN as a publication.