WW ’16: Computer programming with Mr. Hopps

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WW ’16: Computer programming with Mr. Hopps

Credit: Naomi Lathan

Credit: Naomi Lathan

Credit: Naomi Lathan

Computer science and math teacher Michael Hopps introduced computer programming during Winter Week. Students received a short lesson on how to create designs using programming, as well as a look into what computer science classes with Hopps are like.

During the Winter Week introduction to programming, students used the website PencilCode.net to create simple codes. Students were able to explore the website to create different designs using code.

According to Hopps, programming is becoming more and more important as technology becomes a bigger part of our lives.

“There are obvious practical applications for programming. It is becoming more important for every job in the world right now because computers are everywhere,” Hopps said.

Hopps teaches various levels of computer programming classes at WHS. He teaches a range of students, from beginners to experienced programmers.

“I would describe my job as the best job on campus because I kind of created it myself,” Hopps said. “All the classes I teach are classes I developed myself, so I’m really invested in them, and I really believe in them.”

As programming becomes more popular, so do computer science classes at WHS.

“I have been teaching here at the high school for 13 years or so, and 13 years ago it was kind of this weird niche course that a couple of super nerdy kids would take in the corner of the math building,” Hopps said. “But now because technology has advanced, it’s a much more mainstream field of study than it used to be.”

Hopps explains that even though the classes are about programming, he hopes that students learn about more than just computers in his class.

“I hope that students learn to work with one another because my class is very group-work focused, and expressing complex ideas to each other is super important to me,” Hopps said. “I hope that kids learn to love learning and learn to communicate better.”

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